38 Mobile Marketing Statistics to Help You Plan for 2019 

Ramona Sukhraj| Impact

Are you reading this on a mobile device?

Based on the following statistics (and the scene at any Starbucks), I’m willing to bet you are.

Inbound marketers have been following the rise of mobile marketing for years, but considering how ingrained mobile devices are in our lives as both consumers and professionals today, it shouldn’t really be considered a “trend.” It should be a staple. 

Optimizing for mobile  (if not creating a dedicated mobile marketing strategy) is something you should’ve done by now, but if you haven’t, it needs to be done in 2019. No excuses.

The mobile marketing statistics and facts below will help you understand why and also provide some guidance when shaping your mobile marketing strategy in the coming year.

Rather watch? This video contains five of our favorites.

1. As of March 2017, 80% of top Alexa websites were mobile adaptive. (Mobiforge)

This is pretty cut-and-dry. If you want your site to perform well, it needs to be optimized for mobile.

2. 51% of all digital ad budgets in 2016 were spent on mobile. (IAB/PricewaterhouseCoopers)

Marketers and advertisers are heavily investing in mobile, which means, most likely, so is your competition. If you want to stay competitive, you need to have a mobile optimization or marketing strategy in place.

3. By 2019, mobile advertising is expected to represent 72% of all U.S. digital ad spending. (MarketingLand)

But at the same time…

4. 70% of people report disliking mobile ads. (HubSpot)

In fact, mobile ad blocking has increased 90% year-over-year.

5. By 2018, American adults are expected to spend on average 3 hours and 23 minutes on non-voice mobile media. (eMarketer)

That’s up more than 1 hour from 2013. It has increased steadily every year since.

6. 80% of internet users own a smartphone. (Smart Insights)

With so many cell phone services giving away free smartphones with their contracts, this number is only going to keep increasing — which is good news for companies with a mobile marketing strategy.

7. 48% of consumers start mobile research with a search engine –but 33% go directly to the site they want. (Smart Insights)

This is why you want to produce valuable content that makes it easy for your buyer persona to find you online. You also want to optimize for mobile search results.

8. Users spend on average 69% of their media time on smartphones. (comScore)

As a marketer, you need to align with the buyer’s behavior. With more than half of people consuming media via smartphones, you need to make sure yours offers the best experience possible.

9. Google drives 96% of mobile search traffic, followed by Yahoo at 2% and Bing at 1%. (NetMarketShare)

Google doesn’t just dominate search on desktop, but mobile as well. If you want to increase your mobile search traffic, optimize for Google on smaller screen sizes. That means truncated titles (55 to 60 viewable characters including spaces), meta-descriptions, and careful consideration of Google AMP

10. Apps account for 89% of mobile media time, with the other 11% spent on websites. (Smart Insights)

Consumers want to consume media through an app. Provide a great experience for your persona in your app and handle your marketing on the web.

When they are researching however…

11. 33% of consumers start mobile research with a branded website, only 26% with a mobile app. (Smart Insights)

This is why you want to produce valuable content to make your brand the authority in your niche. (Are you starting to see a pattern here?)

12. 80% of social media time is spent on a mobile device. (comScore)

No surprise here. Make sure your social media content (graphics, thumbnails, etc.) look great on mobile. People are much more likely to see it there than on desktop.

13. Pinterest is the most mobile social network and 64% of its referred traffic comes from either smartphones or tablet devices. (Mobile Marketing Watch)

Facebook and Twitter get all the attention, but companies targeting mobile users should look to attract them on Pinterest as well.

14. Over 50% of smartphone users grab their smartphone immediately after waking up. (ExpressPigeon, 2014)

I’ll admit it, that includes me. Keep this in mind when scheduling your content or sending emails. If you publish/send early in the morning, people are more likely to be viewing on mobile.

15. 57% of users say they won’t recommend a business with a poorly-designed mobile site. (socPub)

A poor mobile presence can make your organization look unprofessional and out of touch with the modern consumer. Optimize for mobile to make the right impression.

16. The two most popular ways companies are optimizing for mobile are 1. using a simple template that works for all devices (52%) and 2. creating a mobile responsive email template (39%). (Adestra)

Optimizing emails for mobile is the bare minimum. Smart businesses optimize every aspect of their emails to generate more leads and increase their conversions.

17. 68% of companies have integrated mobile marketing into their overall marketing strategy. (Salesforce)

All of the data has shown that mobile marketing is profitable and shouldn’t be ignored.

18. 71% of marketers believe mobile marketing is core to their business. (Salesforce)

For many of our tech clients, mobile marketing is the top priority and it has shown to have a high ROI.

19. 58% of companies surveyed have a dedicated mobile marketing team. (Salesforce)

If you have the resources, it makes sense to have a team of people with an expertise in mobile marketing to get the most benefit from your marketing efforts.

20. Google says 61% of users are unlikely to return to a mobile site they had trouble accessing and 40% visit a competitor’s site instead. (MicKinsey & Company)

Is your company “phoning in” the mobile experience of your website? Not only are you turning away potential customers, but you’re sending them straight to your competitors that provide a better mobile experience.

21. Tablets account for the highest add-to-cart rates on eCommerce websites at 8.58%. (Smart Insights)

If you’re an online retailer, you should give extra attention to the design and user experience of the tablet version of your website.

22. In 2014, smartphones accounted for over 33% of all online traffic compared to tablets at just over 12%. (MarketingLand)

I know it sounds redundant, but having a responsive website is no longer an option — it’s a requirement.

23. Mobile email opens have grown by 180% in the last three years. (Email Monday)

If your mobile subscribers aren’t opening your marketing emails, it’s not them — it’s you. Here are five seemingly harmless details that drastically affect email open rates:

1. Sender: What Can You Do? Try sending important emails from the name and address of an actual team member, rather than an unfriendly “noreply” or impersonal “ABC Corporation.”

2. The Spammy Subject Line. What Can You Do?
Avoid “Red Flag” Words:
Sale, Free, Deal, Save; though these may seem like words that would pull in a crowd, they’re drastically overused. Most savvy consumers see them and know that the sender is just looking for the final sale.
Be Brief. Create Intrigue. Personalize It.

3. The Preview Text. What Can You Do? The subject line introduces the topic of the email and the preview texts adds a bit more detail about the value inside – optimize this real estate.

4. Your Delivery Time. What Can You Do? Test and analyze, then test and analyze again.

5. Your List. What Can You Do? Take the time to segment your contact database. Some suggestions for segmenting: Geographic Location, Past Buyer Behaviors, Job Title.

24. 83% of mobile users say that a seamless experience across all devices is very important. (Wolfgang Jaegel)

This is something that Apple has mastered and proven to be very effective. Consumers now expect a seamless experience and brand consistency.

25. 91% of mobile users say that access to content is very important. (Cardtapp)

The people have spoken. Your mobile site should make it as easy as possible for your persona to access your content.

26. Average smartphone conversion rates are up 64% compared to the average desktop conversion rates. (CMS Report)

Yet another reason to give extra attention to the mobile experience of your website. If your brand is seeing higher conversions from desktop consider these four simple tips for increasing conversions on your mobile site.

27. 57% of users say they won’t recommend a business with a poorly designed mobile site. (CMS Report)

Web design is no longer just about looks — it’s all about the experience. Now, more than ever, great UX has a higher ROI.

28. 88% of consumers who search for a type of local business on a mobile device call or go to that business within 24 hours. (Nectafy)

Just like your mother told you as a kid, first impressions really do count. People use their mobile device to find a local business when they’re ready to buy and a great mobile website makes the decision even easier for them.

29. 83% of B2B marketers said mobile apps were important to content marketing. (Strategy Trends)

Remember when having a website was cool and not all businesses had one? We’re seeing the exact same trend with mobile apps today.

30. By 2018, 8 in 10 email users will likely access their email accounts exclusively from their mobile devices (emailmonday)

Mobile marketing isn’t just about apps and your website; even your emails need to be fully optimized to offer the best experience on the go.

31. 40% Of Mobile Searches Have Local Intent (Google Mobile Moments Study)

Even local businesses need to be equipped with a mobile strategy!

32. 70% Of Consumers Delete Emails Immediately That Don’t Render Well On A Mobile Device (Blue Hornet)

Don’t let your message get ignored because it wasn’t optimized for mobile viewing.

33. Mobile Offers are Redeemed 10x More Frequently Than Print Offers (eMarketer)

48% of companies are using mobile coupons/offers in 2017. That’s up 16% since 2013.

34. As of Q1 of 2017, Samsung was the leading phone maker (with a 22.8% share) followed by Apple and Huawei. (International Data Corporation)

Even if everyone on your team is a hard core iPhone fan, remember, not everyone is. In fact, globally, Samsung devices are more popular. Make sure to test and optimize for that experience as well.

35. 5-5.1-inch is the most used screen size, 720 x 1280 is the most used screen resolution. (DeviceAtlas)

Every audience is different, but if you don’t have access to formal mobile testing or data on your users, planning around these dimensions are a good starting point.

36. 48% of millennials view video solely on their mobile device. (Source)

If you’re targeting a younger audience, make sure to utilize video in your mobile marketing.

37. Website that load in 5 seconds on mobile see 25% more ad visibility and 70% longer session duration. (Google DoubleClick)

Mobile optimization is more than just visual. Speed always plays a large role.

Here’s a video from our YouTube Channel to put it a bit more into perspective:

38. 79% of people use their smartphone for reading email — a higher percentage than those who use it for making calls. (Email Monday)

We’ve reached a point where the “phone” part of a smartphone is just a feature and not the primary function, which is good news for brands that use inbound marketing as their primary strategy.

Key Takeaways:

  • You can safely assume that if your buyer persona has internet they have a smartphone.
  • People prefer reading emails on their mobile device and use their smartphones more for reading emails than for making calls.
  • Marketers are optimizing for mobile and focusing more on mobile marketing at an increasing rate.
  • Consumers are more likely to recommend and buy from the business that has a better mobile experience.
  • The majority of money spent on digital advertising is targeted towards mobile.
  • Most social media activity takes place on mobile.



8 Mobile Marketing Tips for Small Business

Mobile marketing is constantly moving forward and evolving, stay on top of the trends

By Megan Totka | Business.com

Mobile marketing is different than other methods of marketing because it lets businesses get directly in front of customers on devices they use all the time – tablets and smartphones. From mobile check-ins to text messages, to emails and social media, mobile marketing may help small businesses boost sales when they send coupons or offer discounts, sales, or promotions to customers.  It’s smart to reach out to customers on the devices they constantly have in their hand – this is why mobile marketing can impact both online shoppers and walk-in customers, too.

Luckily, more and more companies and individuals realize the benefits of mobile and want to lead the way into the mobile future – and the first stop is adopting mobile marketing solutions for your small business. Take a look at these 8 mobile marketing tips that can help your small business.

Text marketing

The professional side of texting is something to embrace. SMS [Simple Message Service, aka, text messaging] is for more than casual conversation – even financial institutions now send sensitive data via SMS and it’s pretty powerful. Now that more than three-quarters of the world’s smartphones are SMS-enabled, it’s time to make sure your small business is, too.

Create opt-in campaigns that allow customers to sign up and receive alerts and rewards for joining the campaign. The platform is a great way to encourage customers to take specific action in exchange for a reward, such as a discount on a purchase. There is a greater chance that people will open their texts than read emails, and texts are opened more rapidly than emails, too.

A mobile-ready website

Responsive design is crucial – if you don’t have it, you risk text that doesn’t fit on the page and may notice that your customers come up missing, supporting a competitor who can offer a site that is mobile-ready. Make sure your website reads beautifully whether it is accessed on a laptop, desktop, mobile phone, or tablet.

Create a mobile app

Mobile apps aren’t inexpensive to build – they can easily cost a pretty penny if you’re willing to pay. Like anything, though, with some time and effort, you can make sure the process is affordable. Your app doesn’t have to be super fancy, and you don’t have to join forces with a well-known firm that will charge you a lot of cash. Find new creators who are eager to get business and showcase their talents. Pay them reasonably and offer referrals and site recognition, too.

No matter how you do it, make sure you get an app built, around 80 percent of smartphone users use apps every day. You can’t let your business miss this simple way of making sure your brand is in front of all of those people.

Incorporate mobile payments

Small businesses have either a product or a service to offer consumers. As a result, your strategy should include acceptance of mobile payments – know what to look for in a payment processor before you rush to make a decision. Payment processors offer various benefits when it comes to service, security, ease of use, and cost efficiency. Make it easier for customers to pay you with modern payment options.

Have meaningful social presence

Facebook isn’t all about fun and games, and while it is a lot of fun, it’s also a great way to gain new customers. Marketing is about first giving to your customers. This means you should give your audience on social media what you would want yourself. Share posts and start meaningful conversations. Leave comments and ask and answer questions. Work to make sure your brand is where people see it and appreciate it; it doesn’t take much time out of your day.

Offer up deals

Your business can continue to make money while sending out digital deals. Send messages straight to your consumer’s smartphones, SMS coupons have redemption rates 10 times higher than print coupons like the ones we see in the Sunday paper. The other good news: it’s nearly impossible to lose the smartphone version of a coupon.

Consider mobile customer service

More businesses are jumping on the mobile customer service bandwagon to track orders, take payments, share shipping details, and respond quickly to questions via smartphone. This is easy and convenient for both the small business owner and customers. Plus, customers really enjoy the quick response time mobile customer service offers.

Register with mobile directories

The days of thick phone books with yellow pages are just about history. Instead, the majority of people now turn to mobile directories. To ensure your small business is found, register with various mobile directories. Think along the lines of YP, Yelp and Google+Local.  Remember to include the details of your business such as its name, the products and services offered, business hours, a contact phone number, a link to your site, and your physical address.

Mobile marketing is constantly moving forward and evolving. Stay on top of the trends and times and make sure you know what your competitors are doing in the mobile marketing arena. Try not to fear the cost or changes that accompany mobile technology — Smartphones and small businesses are a perfect match.

In addition, realize that mobile marketing isn’t going away – it’s actually our future — so now is the time to get on board and don’t look back. While some small business owners shy away from mobile because they perceive it to be complex or time-consuming, many realize it’s simply another way to market a small business. After all, small business owners are in a better position to utilize mobile for customer engagement. It’s all about connecting with customers, and mobile allows that to happen.



Rise of AI & AR in mobile marketing

6 trends that will shape mobile marketing in 2019 

Source: Natalie Koltun l Mobile Marketer.com

As the impact of innovations and disruptions of years’ past come into focus​, leading players will battle for dominance in several key areas.

The impact of mobile marketing innovations and disruptions of years’ past will continue to come into focus in 2019 as markets mature and leading players battle for dominance. That’s forecast to be particularly prevalent for mobile video and augmented reality (AR), where strong adoption could hatch some winners, some losers and several acquisitions or mergers. Mobile marketers will also continue to see how social commerce and voice technology can affect the entire customer journey and, when executed well, shorten the sales funnel. Meanwhile, the rollout of 5G will elevate network speed and marketing capabilities across a newly supercharged mobile landscape.Below are six key developments set to shake out this year in the mobile marketing world.

A fight for dominance in mobile video

The numbers confirm what many already know: Mobile video set records in 2018, with even more growth predicted to come. Smartphones became the dominant channel to watch online video, with mobile’s share of online “video starts” crossing 50% for the first time. In tandem, mobile is forecast to account for 72% of the growth in spending on online video advertising. As video continues to blossom, 2019 is likely to see big players in the space fight for dominance.

“You have some major forces like Jeffrey Katzenberg and Quibi who are now getting into a premium, Hollywood game for a mobile-first vision. Major brands will continue to invest significantly in mobile video and perhaps step up the game in production, quality and budgets, following the lead of those major forces.” –Peter Csathy, CEO of consulting firm Creatv Media, told Mobile Marketer.

The next 12 months could prove make-or-break for new players and for two big names that launched in 2018: Facebook Watch and Instagram’s IGTV. Despite Facebook’s billion-dollar investment in these platforms, they have so far underperformed. Facebook clearly sees Watch as a driver of growth, having expanded its ad sales to 40 countries, but the service has struggled to drive viewership. The company will have to prove that both Facebook and Instagram are sources of original content, not just social platforms, Csathy explained, lest they join the mobile-first video graveyard populated by failed efforts from Samsung, Comcast, Verizon and more.The road to success will require “continuous experimentation,” regarding every facet of content. It could also push platforms further into M&A (Merger & Acquisition) of other content sources and brands.”Brand-driven and content-driven M&A will accelerate through 2019,” Csathy said, as platforms look to secure “targeted audiences that [they] can own and really serve.”

Voice tech’s blossoming role in the household

If this year was about testing smart speakers’ usability in the household, 2019 will be the year of brands proving their voice tech’s value. By the end of 2018, ownership of smart speakers like Amazon Echo or Google Home was forecast to hit nearly half (48%) of Americans, up from 32% in August, per Adobe Analytics. Smart speaker adoption is driving consumers’ voice tech usage and pushing marketers to explore how to tap into this burgeoning channel — something that will only evolve this year as people grow more comfortable conversing with devices and the technology becomes increasingly predictive, according to TetraVX’s director of marketing Becky Linahon.”We’ll see these smart home devices searching on our behalf,” she told Mobile Marketer. “Instead of asking ‘can you order almond milk?’ maybe my fridge will remind me I’m almost out, suggest the brand I purchased last time and tell me where I can get it for the best price nearby. “One challenge as voice technology evolves will be customer acquisition because many voice assistants recommend products and brands based on a user’s purchase history. But what about non-brand loyalists, or those already keen on a different brand? “When I tell Alexa I need laundry detergent, she’ll say ‘you bought Tide last week. Do you want to buy Tide again?’ Out of simplicity, I’ll say ‘sure,'” Linahon said. This will push marketers to get more creative in acquiring new customers or luring them from competitors, she suggested. In 2019, organizations will need to understand their voice tech’s place in a household and make sure it plays a role so purposeful, users just can’t turn it off, Devbridge Group’s president Aurimas Adomavicius said in emailed comments.

Social commerce: the new price of admission

While social commerce initially was slow to catch on, social media as a sales channel will soon springboard from a “nice to have” to the “price of admission” for savvy marketers, Columbus Consulting CEO Jon Beck said in comments to Mobile Marketer. About 66% of brands analyzed by researcher Gartner have adopted social commerce strategies within the past year, but according to Elastic Path CMO Darin Archer, brands in 2018 primarily used Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest and Snapchat for acquisition efforts — boosting awareness, generating leads and advertising products. This year, the industry is set to break that tide and focus on engagement, experts said. The goal was once to attract attention and drive consumers to an online store, Archer told Mobile Marketer. In 2019, more social channels will open their platforms to host these journeys natively. “We can’t change these paradigms overnight, but now these platforms are stepping back and saying, ‘hey we need to make this easier,'” Archer said.

“It needs to be more of a convenient, one-click experience on your favorite social app versus being directed off-site to a lengthy checkout. Marketers will need to continue to adapt to how people interact with social media, including through formats like product cards, shoppable pins, chatbots and other fresh features 2019 has in store. Stories have redefined the way brands communicate on Instagram, and creative marketers are now learning to use this format to address each stage of the customer journey, from awareness to direct purchase,” said Talkwalker CEO Todd Grossman. “We’ll see even more investments in this channel in 2019.”

Influencer marketing gets bigger but goes small

Significant growth and a few changes are on the road map for influencer marketing this year. The market size for the strategy will exceed $8 billion in 2020, according to InfluencerDB’s State of The Industry Report. “What will be a big shift in 2019 is traditional dollars — whether it’s from traditional media or PR budgets — going directly into influencer marketing,” Jamie Reardon, CEO of Find Your Influence, told Mobile Marketer. To support their increased investments, marketers will continue to fine-tune their benchmarks for influencers in order to keep a “pulse” on the space, she explained.

“For the last five years, often times influencers have been looked at as incremental dollars, but moving forward, big brands and agencies will be putting together plans for the full year because they have the benchmarks,” Reardon said. With the budget reallocation will come the need for the advertising industry to get serious about increasing trust, transparency and measurement in influencer marketing, as outgoing Unilever CMO and industry thought leader Keith Weed called for at Cannes Lions last year. “When it comes to the entire industry as a whole, guarantees are an aspect brands need and require, whether it’s engagements, impressions or video views,” Reardon said. As campaigns become more robust, brands and agencies will increasingly look for ways to stand out. That will require finding the right influencer for the right campaign. In 2019, brands could leverage localized micro-influencers to better serve campaigns that require a more authentic, specific and local touch, per InfluencerDB’s report.

5G set to supercharge mobile ecosystem

While the 4G mobile network set the stage for more powerful video streaming, programmatic marketplaces, artificial intelligence and a first taste of augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR), experts said ultrafast 5G is set to bring about even more capabilities in the mobile world. Faster download speeds up to 10 times that of 4G will enable marketers to dive deeper into interactive ads, such as playable and AR formats, to offer richer experiences without network latency for mobile users and gamers, according to Tal Shoham, COO at mobile monetization and marketing company ironSource.”We’ll also see an increase in games offering demos of their games before download, as this heavier ad format will no longer be constrained,” Shoham said. “The app stores will therefore open up to these bigger games, leading to richer gaming experiences on mobile devices as the type and number of available games increases.” 5G’s ability to process data more swiftly is predicted to supercharge marketers’ capabilities around personalized content and real-time ad targeting at a more granular level, as well as power the evolution of connected devices like cars, speakers and wearables. An October Intel and Ovum study forecasts that video will comprise 90% of all 5G traffic in 10 years, signaling major opportunity for marketers to develop quality mobile content and better engage audiences. Last month, Verizon and Samsung said they plan to start selling a 5G-capable smartphone within the first half of 2019. Apple is reportedly unlikely to release similar hardware until 2020, potentially giving rivals a chance to woo Apple users to trade in their iPhones. Meanwhile, the 5G ecosystem is expected to see steady expansion this year and beyond. “In 2024, we project that 5G will reach 40 percent population coverage and 1.5 billion subscriptions, making it the fastest generation ever to be rolled out on a global scale,” Ericsson EVP Fredrik Jejdling wrote in a November report.

AR moves out of native apps and onto the mobile web

AR continued its disruptive streak in 2018, becoming a key element of both mobile ads and shopping on social platforms. Forecast to develop into a $83 billion market by 2021, the next 12 months will see the AR space continue to balloon. “AR is going into its grown-up phase,” Caspar Thykier, CEO and co-founder of AR platform Zappar, told Mobile Marketer. Platforms like Apple, Google and Facebook will continue to dominate the space, either by forcing smaller firms to collapse (as Blippar did, innovate (as TikTok has) or be acquired outright. Perhaps Amazon and Snapchat’s already cozy relationship gets even cozier as the former moves into AR shopping. One key development is likely to be a broader move to the mobile web, which will help brands untangle their AR campaigns from connection partners like Facebook, Snapchat and Shazam that offer platforms for AR — for a price — and are able to keep their data within walled gardens. “The best AR is still a preserve of native apps in terms of performance and functionality, and the big change that we’re going to see is a gradual a move to mobile web AR,” Thykier said. “That’s significant for businesses and brands, especially for consumer-packaged goods brands, who are looking to leverage connected packaging and passive print but can’t really command having an app on the user’s home screen.”